Bourbon of USA

Buffalo Trace Mash Bills

Let’s start with the basics: A mash bill is the recipe of grains used to make whiskey. All bourbon is at least 51 percent corn; the rest can vary. Most of the large Kentucky distilleries make three types of bourbon mash—one flavored with rye, one flavored with a little more rye, and a third flavored with wheat—and develop different products by aging those three mash bills to meet various grades and price points. At Buffalo Trace, these three bourbon mash bills and a rye whiskey recipe become at least 15 labels and many reserve and limited-release variants within those labels. To read those labels, one would hardly imagine that the Blanton's Distilling Company, W. L. Weller and Sons, and the Old Rip Van Winkle Distillery are all fanciful names for the same distillery, Buffalo Trace that distills 60,000 gallons of mash into bulk spirit in a continuous still. While the four mash bills contribute to the flavor, the more significant differentiation among brands is done in the warehouse, where the type of construction, placement within the warehouse, and duration of aging have a stronger impact on the finished spirit.

You will find Blanton’s, Weller, buffalo trace, and Old Rip Van Winkle at Reisterstown Wine & spirits located in Reisterstown Maryland

Jack Daniel’s and the Lincoln County Process

Jack Daniel’s was started by its namesake distiller in the 1870s and is now the largest-selling American whiskey in the world. Jack Daniel's is a Tennessee whiskey, which is differentiated from bourbon only in that it is made in Tennessee and filtered through maple charcoal before aging, a method known as the Lincoln County Process. This gives it a stronger wood character than bourbon aged for the same amount of time. Jack Daniel’s meets the criteria to be called bourbon, but contrarian Tennesseans long ago settled on the distinction of Tennessee Whiskey, which is still not a federally recognized category. State law now mandates new Tennessee distillers must use the Lincoln County Process, though Pritchards, which was making Tennessee Whiskey without it before the law, gets grandfathered in. From the point of a view of a craft distiller, the charcoal filtering is a bit of a cheat, since it makes the whiskey taste somewhat more mature than it is; but they've been doing it for 140 years, so it's hard to argue that they are doing it wrong.

 

There are only two widely distributed "commercial" Tennessee Whiskeys. George Dickel is the other

We carry huge selection of Jack Daniel whiskey at Reisterstown wine & spirits

Pappy Van Winkle’s Family Reserve

Let’s just get this one out of the way. Considered by many to be the world’s finest bourbon, the 20-year-old hooch is the stuff of legends. Pappy hunting is now a pastime among bourbon fans, and while any Pappy is good Pappy, this is the nicest of the bunch. Its sweetness and finish that seems to last 20 years itself are almost worth the hard to find Pappy van winkles that we have in stock Reisterstown Wine & Spirits

Hudson Baby Bourbon Whiskey

The first bourbon to be distilled in New York makes this list for its 100% New York corn mash bill. Yes, it’s 100% corn. Bourbon, by definition, has to be at least 51% corn, but rarely do you see only corn being used. What does that mean to you? Well, for starters, it is an acceptable bourbon for those allergic to grain normally used in the mash. Also, 100% corn bourbons tend to have a sweeter profile, so if you have a sweet tooth, this could be the bottle for you. It’s also unique because it’s aged in much smaller barrels than normal. Smaller barrels means more surface to liquid contact. We have limited in stock at Reisterstown wine & Spirits

The first bourbon to be distilled in New York makes this list for its 100% New York corn mash bill. Yes, it’s 100% corn. Bourbon, by definition, has to be at least 51% corn, but rarely do you see only corn being used. What does that mean to you? Well, for starters, it is an acceptable bourbon for those allergic to grain normally used in the mash. Also, 100% corn bourbons tend to have a sweeter profile, so if you have a sweet tooth, this could be the bottle for you. It’s also unique because it’s aged in much smaller barrels than normal. Smaller barrels means more surface to liquid contact. We have limited in stock at Reisterstown wine & Spirits

Blanton’s

With numerous awards under its belt, Blanton’s—or, “Blanton’s Single Barrel Bourbon,” as it was originally known—is deserving of a spot on any Bourbon lover’s bar. Since it’s a single barrel bourbon, there can be slight variations, but we’ve found the nose to be packed with delicious vanilla and caramel notes, and, while the finish leaves a little to be desired, the overall aroma and taste are more than fantastic. Even if you don’t want to drink it often, the bottle looks mighty fine on any home bar, as the unique bottle shape and iconic horse and jockey topper are hard to miss.

Reisterstown Wine & Spirits

W.L. Weller 12 Year

You want Pappy but can’t get Pappy. It happens. Forlorn hunters should seek out W.L. Weller 12 Year. The wheated bourbon is about the closest you’ll come to experiencing what a young Pappy tastes like. That’s because it’s basically, for all intents and purposes, Pappy—or at least a slightly inferior Pappy. You see, W.L. Weller 12 Year is Pappy that didn’t quite make the cut to become Pappy. Just missing the Pappy threshold means Buffalo Trace used it to make W.L. Weller 12 Year. Super smooth and approachable, but still with plenty of complexity to make those tiny taste bud brains

Reisterstown Wine & Spirits

Four Roses Single Barrel

Okay, you want a bourbon that’s a stunner and doesn’t break the bank? This is it. Four Roses Single Barrel rivals many more expensive bourbons at half the price. It has a high rye mash bill (35% rye) and definitely delivers on that spiciness, but it does so without having that overwhelm everything else going on. The nose offers up all sorts of notes, and the finish is nice and long. Don’t take our word for it; Four Roses Single Barrel has won medals

Then you will find it at Reisterstown wine & Spirits

John E. Fitzgerald Larceny

Like we said, some bourbons on this list will be pricey, very pricey, but not all are. Want a tremendous bottle that’s less than 30 bucks? Get yourself some John E. Fitzgerald Larceny. From Heaven Hill, this wheated bourbon gets its name from John E. Fitzgerald’s propensity to sneak into warehouses and steal the best barrels for his use. The taste is approachable but still full of flavor.

Maryland premier bourbon store Reisterstown wine & spirits

Proximate of Owings mills and Baltimore

George T. Stagg

The finest of Buffalo Trace’s Antique Collection, George T. Stagg is a high proof beast that opens up like a folded paper fortune teller with a drop of water. It’s rich and loaded with dark fruit and other punchy notes. There’s a burn, hell it has an ABV of around 70%, but it isn’t like taking a flamethrower to your tongue. Consistently highly rated, George T. Stagg is a rich bourbon perfect for cold winter nights

11933 Reisterstown Rd, Reisterstown, MD 21136

Reisterstown Wine & Spirits

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